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Archive for February, 2013

Saturday, February 16, 2013

See Art More Often: Electric Paris @ The Clark

Electric Paris @ The Clark

February 16, 2013 – April 7, 2013

Long before the widespread use of electricity, Paris had been known as “The City of Light” — the name arose in the eighteenth century, when Enlightenment philosophers made Paris a center of ideas and metaphorical illumination. By the late nineteenth century, the term had come to be associated with “real” light in the artificially illuminated streets and boulevards of the French capital, and its showy spaces of public entertainment and leisure.

For more on Electric Paris:  http://www.clarkart.edu/museum/exhibitions-future-detail.cfm?EID=3465

Image credit: Alexandre Lunois, The Department Store (Le Bon Marché), 1902. Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute, 1990.14

Sunday, February 10, 2013

Backstories: The Other Side of Art @ The Clark

Now through April 21 @ The Clark

Works of art can lead a double life. Often, one side is revealed to the public while the other—the back—remains hidden from view. In Backstories: The Other Side of Art, these hidden sides come to light as a selection of works tell their little-known “backstories,” revealing how they were made, how they have been cared for by collectors, the many changes they have survived, or the period during which they were created. The exhibition spans five centuries and includes paintings, works on paper, sculpture, silver, and porcelain.

More about Backstories: The Other Side of Art

http://clarkart.edu/exhibitions/backstories/content/exhibition.cfm

image credit:

Alfred Stieglitz
The Terminal, 1893
Gift of Penelope Tyson Adams in memory of my husband, John Barclay Adams
© 2012 Georgia O’Keeffe Museum / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Tuesday, February 5, 2013

Kidspace @ the Clark: Lions and Tigers and Museums, Oh My!

Kidspace @ the Clark: Lions and Tigers and Museums, Oh My!

Now through September 8

A single image can spark curiosity that leads in many directions. Inspired by Peter Paul Rubens’s enormous painting Lion and Tiger Hunting (in the collection of the Musée des Beaux-Arts in Rennes, France), visitors will explore many questions: Who will be victorious? Could this animal hunt really have happened—and did it? What events or personalities caused Rubens to paint this picture? What problems did Rubens encounter when painting such a big picture so very long ago? This exhibition will include a number of hands-on activities.

More about Lions and Tigers and Museums, Oh My!

http://clarkart.edu/exhibitions/kidspace/content/exhibition.cfm